November 2018

How Does Your Smile Make You Feel?

Exactly how do you feel about your smile? Sure, it feels great to chew confidently without worrying about teeth shifting or moving and it feels wonderful to have the firm, facial structures your teeth help support. It feels excellent to talk as you always did, and to eat what you want, when you want. But how does having a healthy, happy smile really make you feel? We smile when we are happy, we show our teeth whilst expressing ourselves, when we meet friends or family, and when we say thanks or communicate our wishes to others. So a really strong, natural, happy smile that is healthy does far more than function physically; it has a huge impact on how we feel about ourselves. Understanding how integral an attractive and healthy smile is in relation to how you feel about yourself is really important, so you can look at improving your smile, in a way that also improves your confidence. Your Smile And Your Confidence A smile is incredibly important when it comes to a person's confidence, for many different reasons. Expression & Communication We express ourselves using our smile, in lots of different ways. Visually you let people know you are happy with your smile. You also speak using your teeth, tongue and lips, which allows you to let people know what you are thinking, feeling and what you want them to know. Your teeth help you exhibit emotions and your smile is a massive part of self expression. Social Life

Making The Connection Snoring can be so very irritating and sometimes downright rage-inducing, particularly if you're the one sleeping next to the person doing it! Snoring can lead to sleep deprivation in both the person who is snoring and their partner, leading to cranky moods, lack of concentration and sleepiness in the day, amongst other symptoms. Snoring may even be related to more serious conditions such as sleep apnoea, where a person stops breathing several times through the night. Sleep apnoea can cause even more worrying symptoms on top of those you get because of snoring, such as increasing your risk of strokes or high blood pressure. So whether you snore, grind your teeth or you have sleep apnoea, the fact of the matter is you aren't sleeping as soundly as you should, and the chances are your partner isn't either. The good news? Your dentist can help! First things first though, lets take a closer look at snoring, sleep disorders and your dental health. Snoring Snoring is a common issue experienced by both men and women and you tend to be more likely to snore if you are overweight, smoke, drink large amounts of alcohol, or sleep on your back. It is caused by the parts of the mouth vibrating as you breathe in and out and can be very mild, or quite extreme. Snoring often causes more issues for the partner of the person who snores as it keeps them awake. However, the person snoring may wake themselves up several times and they may find their sleep quality isn't very good, causing tiredness and sleep deprivation over time. How Crown House Dental Can Help We recommend you see your GP if snoring is having a drastic effect on your quality of life as they may wish to check you don't have sleep apnoea which is more serious than snoring alone. We may be able to help with your snoring issue by treating you with a special dental device which brings the tongue forward if the problem is mild and if you do not require sleep clinic intervention. At the very least we can provide help and support in keeping your oral health in good condition alongside medical issues you may be challenged with. Sleep Apnoea